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Computing

To be a computing expert.....

Hello, I am Mr Carroll and I am the Computing and Online Safety Coordinator

 

Why do we teach Computing and Online Safety at Hayfield Lane?

 

Intent 

Computing at Hayfield Lane Primary intends to develop ‘thinkers of the future’ through a modern, ambitious and relevant education in computing. We want to equip pupils to use computational thinking and creativity that will enable them to become active participants in the digital world. It is important to us that the children understand how to use the ever-changing technology to express themselves, as tools for learning and as a means to drive their generation forward into the future.

 Whilst ensuring they understand the advantages and disadvantages associated with online experiences, we want children to develop as respectful, responsible and confident users of technology, aware of measures that can be taken to keep themselves and others safe online.

Our aim is to provide a computing curriculum that is designed to balance acquiring a broad and deep knowledge alongside opportunities to apply skills in various digital contexts. Beyond teaching computing discreetly, we will give pupils the opportunity to apply and develop what they have learnt across wider learning in the curriculum.

 

Implementation

We teach the National Curriculum, supported by a clear skills and knowledge progression. This ensures that skills and knowledge are built on year by year and sequenced appropriately to maximise learning for all children.

To ensure a broad range of skills and understanding, Computing is taught across three main strands: digital literacy, problem solving and logical thinking as well as creative content. Within digital literacy, children learn to be responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.  

Through problem solving and logical thinking, we teach children to understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation. Also to analyse problems to computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems.

Within our creative content units, the children learn to evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems

We also teach a progression of Computing vocabulary to support children in their understanding of these terms as they gain a greater understanding of these different concepts.

 

Impact

We encourage our children to enjoy and value the curriculum we deliver. We will constantly ask the WHY behind their learning and not just the HOW. We want learners to discuss, reflect and appreciate the impact computing has on their learning, development and well-being.

Finding the right balance with technology is key to an effective education and a healthy life-style. We feel the way we implement computing helps children realise the need for the right balance and one they can continue to build on in their next stage of education and beyond. We encourage regular discussions between staff and pupils to best embed and understand this. The way pupils showcase, share, celebrate and publish their work will best show the impact of our curriculum. We also look for evidence through reviewing pupil’s knowledge and skills digitally through tools like Seesaw and observing learning regularly.

Progress of our computing curriculum is demonstrated through outcomes and the record of coverage in the process of achieving these outcomes.

 

E-Safety and Digital Citizenship

A key part of implementing our computing curriculum was to ensure that safety of our pupils is paramount. We take online safety very seriously and we aim to give children the necessary skills to keep themselves safe online. Children have a right to enjoy childhood online, to access safe online spaces and to benefit from all the opportunities that a connected world can bring them, appropriate to their age and stage.

 Children build online resilience through the use of the ‘Project Evolve – Education for a Connected World’ framework. The framework aims to support and broaden the provision of online safety education, so that it is empowering, builds resilience and effects positive culture change. The objectives promote the development of safe and appropriate long-term behaviours, and support educators in shaping the culture within their setting and beyond.

 

Within each year group topics include:

 

  • Self Image and Identity - This strand explores the differences between online and offline identity beginning with self-awareness, shaping online identities and media influence in propagating stereotypes. It identifies effective routes for reporting and support and explores the impact of online technologies on self-image and behaviour.
  • Online Relationships - This strand explores how technology shapes communication styles and identifies strategies for positive relationships in online communities. It offers opportunities to discuss relationships, respecting, giving and denying consent and behaviours that may lead to harm and how positive online interaction can empower and amplify voice.
  • Online Reputation -  This strand explores the concept of reputation and how others may use online information to make judgements. It offers opportunities to develop strategies to manage personal digital content effectively and capitalise on technology’s capacity to create effective positive profiles.
  • Online Bullying - This strand explores bullying and other online aggression and how technology impacts those issues. It offers strategies for effective reporting and intervention and considers how bullying and other aggressive behaviour relates to legislation.
  • Managing Online information - This strand explores how online information is found, viewed and interpreted. It offers strategies for effective searching, critical evaluation of data, the recognition of risks and the management of online threats and challenges. It explores how online threats can pose risks to our physical safety as well as online safety. It also covers learning relevant to ethical publishing.
  • Health Well-being and Lifestyle - This strand explores the impact that technology has on health, well-being and lifestyle e.g. mood, sleep, body health and relationships. It also includes understanding negative behaviours and issues amplified and sustained by online technologies and the strategies for dealing with them.
  • Privacy and Security - This strand explores how personal online information can be used, stored, processed and shared. It offers both behavioural and technical strategies to limit impact on privacy and protect data and systems against compromise. 
  • Copyright and Ownership - This strand explores the concept of ownership of online content. It explores strategies for protecting personal content and crediting the rights of others as well as addressing potential consequences of illegal access, download and distribution.

The following items are the format of standard computing lessons at Hayfield Lane Primary:

 

REVIEW- opportunity for children to connect to prior learning from a previous learning journey or session. The connection to prior learning (and comparable themes within curriculum areas) is drawn attention to by teachers and staff/children recall previous learning with links explained by pupils. This helps to ensure that items are retained by children in the longer term.  Each learning journey has been crafted to ensure that underlying connections and themes can be explicitly made-these are called the ‘schema’. Examples of this are evident in the DAILY REVIEW BOX, recap questions, retrieval practice or quizzing.

 

EXPLAIN- teachers then explain the small step teaching point, previous gaps and deeper understanding elements of the lesson – we call these our LEARNING STARS. These are the criteria for the children to work to, with the 3 star aspect being a deepening of understanding aspect. 1 star is the gap in knowledge from previous journeys for the class. These are progressive and enable children to build to a final outcome- the BIG PROJECT/final piece of the journey. Within this section, misconceptions from formative assessments are discussed with children.

 

MODEL-Pupils are given high quality examples via teacher modelling. The modelling of the example also requires lots of active practice of the pupil. In these mini ‘chunk and chew’ active elements, children are able to develop critical thinking and collaborative learning aspects which are then embedded further by the class teacher. They are given time to verbalise and refine their thinking in collaboration with others.  Quality worked examples are created and added to the classroom working walls to support learning across sequences of lessons. Misconceptions are also addressed. An example of this would be a teacher modelling how to create an introduction in a report about a point in history by having mini learning connection tasks, linking to prior reading,  that build to the teacher modelling of an effective paragraph of text.

 

APPLY-  This is the element of the lesson where pupils/collaboration partners begin to undertake the task set. Additional scaffolds and methods of support may be used to allow children to succeed within this aspect- working wall support, word mats, voice dictation apps, targeted support via a teaching assistant. 

 

DEEPEN- at the end of the lesson the teacher will examine how effectively the children have met the star grids. Within this aspect, pupils will critique, summarise, explain, compare and contrast their findings. These elements are used to enable children to transfer knowledge and skills into their longer term memory.  DEEPENING LEARNING is present in the REVIEW, EXPLAIN, MODEL and APPLY stages.

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